Friday, April 6, 2012

Follow Friday - Steve Morse One-step webpages

I've used the great tools on Steve Morse's website, One-Step Webpages, for quite some time but browsing the 1940 census using his 1940 Census ED Finder brings my love to a whole new level. Case in point: I am searching for my husband's Italian relatives in the Bronx. That is a massive search area and by using the enumeration district finder tool on Steve's website, I was able to easily narrow down my search to the correct district. They are not located in the same place as 1930, but by using the tool on Steve's website I saved hours of fruitless searching to learn the same thing.

This web page is essentially a specially designed search engine, with unique search options for different items related to genealogy research. Using the tools on the site you can easily search for ancestors in immigration records, censuses and even vital records. It is a must-have tool for your 1940 census research.

2 comments:

Kathy, the Single-minded Offshoot said...

Excellent post, Heather. Steve Morse's new ED webpage had not yet come to my attention. While I grew up in a small village, it still saved time for me and also explained just how the enumeration district was set up. The railroad track that bordered our farm field was the dividing line.

As an "old-timer" at genealogy, I am rather glad that the index for this census will not be immediate. As I searched the 1940 census, I could actually trace the path of the census taker--north through the village, down a smaller road to the lime kiln area next to Lake Winnebago, then a right turn toward the main highway, a turn south, and past my mom and dad's farm. So many names that were familiar. The census taker gave me a real trip down memory lane!

Heather Kuhn Roelker said...

Cathy, such a good point! I have had a blast just searching through the pages based on my knowledge of where people lived. This was easy for the lines that lived in the same place for generations, but I will admit that I am looking forward to the index for my Bronx research! ;)